Travelling with your dog: what’s the law?

Author: Neil Smith   Date Posted:27 March 2017 

With the school holidays fast approaching and Easter just around the corner, many of us want to pack up and take a well-deserved break. I know for us at Bark Control this includes taking our dogs on our holiday.The Ultimate Dog Travel Pack including car/ute restraints, non-spill bowls, harnesses and more

There’s been a lot of controversy around the ‘right’ way to travel with a pet and it differs from state-to-state, which makes it tricky for those of us going on an interstate road trip or travelling long distances for work.

 

Never fear, we have compiled a list of the legislation across this great nation to ensure nobody gets left out of the loop (or fined).

 

If you are uncertain about meeting the legal requirements for traveling with your dog

just think “is my dog safe, secure and comfortable?”.

 

State

Penalty

Laws

QLD Maximum penalty is $35,340 fine or 1 year in jail.
  • Cage or tether your dog at all times if they travel in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks. This stops a dog from falling out or injuring itself and fulfils your legal obligation to make sure your dog is safe.
NSW

Maximum penalty for an individual is $5500 or 6 months in jail.  For a corporation it is $27,500.

 

Police can also issue of the spot fines of $400+ and a possible loss of up to 3 demerit points.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.
  • If in a car, the pet cannot sit on your lap.
  • There is no specific reference in the legislation covering the restraint of dogs inside the vehicle but the police can fine you if they feel the dog is distracting the driver.
VIC Maximum penalty is $1554.60.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.
SA Maximum penalty is $750.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.
WA Penalties ranges from $2000 - $50,000 and 5 years in jail.
  • The legislation is vague and says you can be fined if the dog is transported in a way that causes, or is likely to cause, it unnecessary harm. We recommend following the laws of other states to  ensure your dog is safely restrained.
TAS Maximum penalty for an individual is $15,700 or 1 year in jail.  For a corporation it is $78,500.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.
  • Dogs must also be restrained when travelling inside the vehicle.
ACT Maximum penalty for an individual is $3,000. For a corporation it is $15,000.
  • A person must not transport or contain an animal in circumstances under which the animal is subjected to unnecessary injury, pain or suffering.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.
NT Maximum penalty of $23,100 or 18 months in jail. 
  • A person must not transport or contain an animal in circumstances under which the animal is subjected to unnecessary injury, pain or suffering.
  • Dog must be restrained so it can’t fall out when travelling in the back of utes, tray backs or trucks.

 

The Ultimate Dog Travel Pack

If you’re looking for a way to keep your dog safe, secure and comfortable on your next holiday we recommend our ultimate dog travel packs. These include a harness, dog seatbelt or ute lead, and a non-spill water bowl. Your dog will be safely and comfortably restrained and hydrated wherever your travel, whether they are inside or outside the vehicle. The whole pack starts at $58.45 and can be purchased here - http://bit.ly/2ncU08f

We hope this helps clear up any confusion you have about the laws for traveling with your dog. Hopefully everyone gets to have some time off over the Easter break. Remember, dogs can’t eat chocolate!

Julius K9 Car restraint for Dogs - keeping your dog safe, secure and comfortable when in the car